Online Learning and Dual Credit

Grace Prep was one of the first schools in the area to use online learning. Early projections suggest that by the year 2020 over 50% of all courses will be taught online.

We are enhancing our academic program through a partnership with Sevenstar Academy. They provide an inventory of online Christian courses and teachers that we can utilize to meet the needs of your family.

Partnering with Sevenstar is a prudent strategy to allow us to offer a broader curriculum for grades 6-12 without having to hire additional teaching staff.

We have reviewed these courses, finding them to meet the academic standards at Grace Prep. The courses described below have been taken by over 100,000 students in Florida Virtual School. Students who have taken these courses have scored higher on state and AP tests than traditional classroom scores. Sevenstar has taken these courses and bought the rights to modify them to create a Christian worldview online curriculum with biblical integration throughout each course. This is an important factor in considering a partnership with Sevenstar.  Check with us on the cost of these courses.

Sevenstar also helps us connect our students to over 130 dual credit college courses. Enrolling in these courses allows your child to get a head start on college resulting in significant cost savings for the family. The cost of a 3 credit college course through Sevenstar is around $700—this is substantially less than what you would pay at most colleges!

Our mission is Christian education. We want to provide the best for your family!

Courses

>> Jump to Dual Credit Courses

Bible

Apologetics I and II We are commanded as Christians to ‘always be prepared when anyone asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have’ (I Peter 3:15).  These courses are designed to help students “always be prepared.”  To fail to offer young followers of Christ the opportunity to know and understand the rational reasons for Christianity is to prepare them for a life of shallow faith or to set them up for disillusionment over what they “grew up believing.”  Apologetics will open students’ minds to the logic of Christianity and the rationality of the Christian worldview.  Apologetics I and II will include Scripture memorization and personal devotional time as important aspects of a whole apologist.  A 3rd course- Advanced Apologetics is planned for release within one year.

Apologetics I will introduce the rationale for studying apologetics and provide a basic understanding of the study of rational arguments.  The course will define and identify worldviews helping the student to see the distinctions of a Christian worldview.  The relationship between evangelism and apologetics will be studied.  In the context of evangelism the course will prepare students to present arguments for the existence of God and the validity of Scripture.  This is a semester course and won an ACSI award in 2006.

Apologetics II: The second course in apologetics will start with creation in Genesis and end with the new creation brought about by the resurrection of Jesus Christ.  Much time will be devoted to understanding the present debate of origins scientifically and theologically.  In this course the problem of pain – why bad things happen to good people – will be responded to.  Most importantly, reasons for belief in the resurrection will be studied and responses to common objections to the resurrection will be addressed.  This is a semester course and won an ACSI award in 2006.  Students are not required to take Apologetics I before Apologetics II.
Basic Bible Doctrine I and II Basic Bible Doctrine I is an upper-level high school course that covers several of the basic doctrines in Scripture, including the doctrines of Scripture, God, man, and sin. These teachings are dealt with in a systematic way that shows the unity and consistency of biblical truth.

Basic Bible Doctrine II continues where Basic Bible Doctrine I left off.  It covers the basic doctrines of Christ, Salvation, Holy Spirit, and Last Things. Care is taken to ensure that the doctrines presented are firmly established on the inerrant Word of God.

Have We Lost Our Minds?!  Worldview Curriculum for Teenagers Have We Lost Our Minds?! Directs students to comprehend core Christian truths with immediate application to their personal life, countering current cultural ideas. The student is taught a basis for Christian thought so that they construct a biblical worldview which addresses real issues in the real world.  Because this course is designed to engage worldly thought processes, it is imperative students be able to rent, download, or borrow movies (i.e., Signs, The Matrix, Mission to Mars, etc.) and music. Since they are contemporary movies, parental discernment is advised before signing up for the class. This course is best taken by those that have finished the second semester of their sophomore year in high school (and those older than that).

Life Shaping Decisions- Applying God’s Word to College and Career Planning Life-Shaping Decisions is a one-semester course that aims at helping high school students think about life after high school from God’s perspective. In today’s world, that is a difficult task. Most people are consumed with living life from a perspective adopted from the world around them. This course will challenge young adults with the biblical concept of career stewardship. It will also give them the resources to begin building their own career plan wisely and faithfully.
Jesus: Prophet, Priest, King and Savior Acts 4:12 declares that there is no other name given to mankind, that we might be saved–Jesus. Students will get to know Jesus through a topical study of His work and ministry, both on Earth and in Heaven. Jesus ties together God’s plan throughout the Old Testament and His interaction and intervention in the lives of those who follow Him today. Students will explore both the Old Testament roots of Jesus’ various ministries and the way those roles influence their current relationship with Him. The last module takes those ideas and puts them into practice, allowing students the opportunity to see Jesus live His life and do His ministry through them.  This year long course is designed for those in grades 5 to 9.

New Testament Survey- Dual Credit This course covers the literature of the New Testament. Special attention will be given to the life of Christ and the history of the early church, including the life of Paul. This is a college course designed for and offered through Sevenstar Academy by Indiana Wesleyan University. Since successful completion earns college credit, it is open to high school Juniors and Seniors. The cost is the same as an AP course.

Old Testament Survey-Dual Credit A study of the Old Testament, highlighting the cultural background underlying the books of the Old Testament. Topics include major archaeological finds, Old Testament culture as it relates to today’s culture, and the foundational relationship between the Old Testament and the New Testament. This is a college course designed for and offered through Sevenstar Academy by Indiana Wesleyan University. Since successful completion earns college credit, it is open to HS Juniors and Seniors. The cost is the same as an AP course.
Understanding the Times I and II Understanding the Times (I and II) is a one or two semester course for the 11th or 12th grader (or adult) that brings a host of Christian worldview and apologetic experts to you. This class will help you clearly understand the tenets of the Christian worldview and how it compares with the tenets of other leading worldviews of our day: Islam, Secular Humanism, Marxism, New Age, and Postmodernism. It is a challenging, demanding, and rich course.

Some of the issues covered include: abortion, apologetics, the arts, biotechnology, critical thinking, cults, euthanasia, leadership, radical environmentalism, radical feminism, the problem of evil, religious pluralism, scriptural reliability, and more.  The material has been provided through a partnership with Summit Ministries.

English/Language Arts

English I This course seeks to expand a student’s personal, social, literary, historical and spiritual vision. Freshman Survey will provide students with activities which highlight many types of vision, including: foresight, tunnel vision, double vision, blurred vision, x-ray vision, and insight. The idea of vision will control each activity and also extend into the community, as students participate in GLOBAL VIEW, a cultural community arts project, and plan a short term missions trip. The course will look at how internal (“I”) and external (“other”) visions connect to create the “real world” all people share, and how ultimately God’s Word is the standard by which we measure all truth and reality.

English II English II is typically considered a sophomore English course that includes reading selections from world literature. The motif, or theme, of the course revolves around the idea of dreams-the unobtainable and the obtainable. Accordingly, the readings relate to themes of fantasy, dreams, and goal setting. For instance, the Shakespeare selection you will study is A Midsummer Night’s Dream. This course is built on National Standards-the guiding document for state standards and a state’s curriculum. Some topics included in this course are drama and Shakespeare, I-search research, mythology, analysis of fiction and nonfiction as related to the theme of dreams and goal setting, and analysis of literature within the context of a biblical worldview. As a member of this class, you will study various means of communication: oral, visual, electronic, and textual as you hone your language arts skills.

English III Using the theme of the newspaper, this Junior-level course covers American literature written between the Early American period up to the present. The selection of literature ranges from fiction and poetry to speeches, sermons, letters, and journals. Students will see where this literature fits in relation to the events and culture of the time period and how the Word of God is present in all subjects and is the foundation of all literature.

English IV Doors and Choices is the motif for English IV allowing students to explore the various “doors of knowledge and opportunity” awaiting them as they transition from high school to college and work. Students will study a variety of literature representing a broad spectrum of genres including poetry, short stories, drama, fiction and nonfiction and complete assignments which allow students to choose from different types of assessments to demonstrate their knowledge.

*All English courses include an honors track that students can choose to complete

Math

Algebra I Travel around the world and discover the applications of algebra by experiencing field trips, web searches, and labs. The course is a foundation mathematics course for all future mathematics courses! This course meets all NCTM (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics) standards. The emphasis in this course is on honoring God in all we do, learning more about Him through mathematics, and student success by way of varied learning styles using applications, hands- on activities, group interactions, discoveries, and, of course, technology.

Algebra II Experience Algebra II as an employee of a fictitious Functional Consulting Company. A combination of business trips with the application of learned concepts will ensure your rise from Junior Associate to Senior Staff Member. Algebra II is an advanced Algebra course, required for college entry, which meets all the NCTM (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics) Standards. The emphasis in this Algebra II course is on student success by way of varied learning styles using applications, hands-on activities, group interactions, discoveries, and, of course, technology. An integration of faith and mathematical study is embedded throughout the course with the purpose of helping students grow stronger in their Christian faith. Students are challenged to see how mathematic principles reflect God’s qualities, are useful in developing Biblical character, and form the structure of God’s creation.

Consumer Math This comprehensive review and study of arithmetic skills applies to both personal and vocational business opportunities. Topics include whole numbers, fractions, percentages, basic statistics, and graphs. Practical applications in finance, taxes, budgeting, banking and home ownership are provided.

Geometry Observe the principles of geometry at work in God’s world. Investigate and discover why the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapsed and the Great Pyramids of Giza did not. Throughout this course, students will actively use their study of geometry to discover more about God, their Christian faith, the mathematical designs God has placed in creation, and the legacy of famous Christian mathematicians. This course will also help students develop geometric relationships and deductive strategies that can be used to solve real-world and mathematical problems. The connection between Geometry and Architecture will be established through active participation and observation of the presence of Geometry in architecture, in both the modern and ancient world. Geometry is a required course for college entry, which meets all NCTM (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics) standards.

Pre-Calculus Students, as mathematic analysts, will investigate advanced mathematics concepts and use them to solve problems encountered in operating national parks. Throughout the course, students will be exploring the mathematical design of God’s creation and how their lives should reflect His glory. The core components of the course include the study of functions and the development of skills necessary for future success in calculus. In addition, a detailed examination of trigonometry and elements of analytical geometry are incorporated in the curriculum.

Science

Biology The Biology course is designed as a Travel Agency experience. Students experience biology concepts and ideas through their travels and adventures. There are two purposes for this course:
1) To provide exploratory and laboratory experiences with real-life applications in the biological sciences
2) To enable students to marvel in God’s creation and defend the doctrine of creation through the Bible and scientific evidence

Chemistry Put on your safety goggles and tour this chemistry course by applying concepts to industrial environments. Students will learn about God’s wonderful Creation through the Nuclear Power Plant module to study the atom, travel through the Water Treatment Plant to study properties of matter, and move through several other industrial buildings to complete their study of chemistry. The purpose of this course is to study the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter. Laboratory investigations of selected topics in the content, which also include the use of scientific method, measurement, laboratory apparatus, and safety procedures, are an integral part of this course. You will not only learn new things about God’s creation, but you will grow in your knowledge of how the Bible relates to chemistry and life. The primary purpose of this course is to use the industrial applications of chemistry to study the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter. This course will include hands-on laboratory investigations.

Physics The regular and honors physics course is presented as a challenging, but fun experience. Using the motif of an amusement park, Physics World students explore physics concepts using laboratory activities, videos, software, and web sites. Get in line. Tickets are going fast! The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities to study the concepts, theories, and laws governing the interaction of matter, energy, and forces, and their applications to the real world through exploratory investigations and activities. The course will also reveal many truths about Jesus Christ, our Creator and Sustainer. God, at creation, established the natural laws studied here. His designs in Nature teach us many truths about our all-powerful God.

Earth and Space Science Exploration is the key to success in this course. As a member of an exploration team, students investigate the atmosphere, freshwater hydrology, ocean floor features, plate tectonics, geologic principles, the rock cycle, geologic time, and space. Students will have the opportunity to do hands on activities in each module and they will interact with the course content in a variety of ways.
Four perspectives taken during explorations will provide the backdrop for the development of course concepts, activities, and web adventures: Global, Regional, Local, and Personal. This will be a full year, 1 credit course. Note: The honors component is built into the course, so every student who successfully completes the course as written will receive honors credit.

Marine Science Set sail on a research expedition to explore the marine environment. Our virtual expedition will leave from Tampa Bay and travel around the Earth investigating the many habitats and organisms of the oceans. As a crew member, you will be conducting research, performing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and discovering man’s interrelationship with the marine environment. The purpose of the course is to provide an overview of the marine environment. The content includes the nature of science, the origins of the oceans, the chemical and physical structure of the marine environment, ecology of the various sea zones, marine communities, and the interrelationship between man and the ocean.  We will learn about God’s Creation and how to better fulfill his charge to care for and rule over the earth.

Social Sciences

Psychology I and II Psychology I and II are semester courses.  Students must take Psychology I before they take Psychology II unless they have done this elsewhere.

These courses are an introduction to the study of human thought, feeling, and behavior.  The courses will survey major areas in the field of psychology including biological contributions to behavior, child development, learning, memory, personality, psychological disorders, and social psychology.   This will taught from a Christian World View and resources added to help students understand God’s perspective on these topics.

While this is not an Advanced Placement Course if a student takes Psychology I and Psychology II and elects to participate in the honors component of the class, they can choose to sit for the AP Exam in Psychology.  Students who indicate an interest in taking the AP Exam in Psychology will receive additional instructions as to how and when to accomplish this goal.  They will also be directed to resources to help them study and to take a practice test.

 Social Studies

American History In this course, students will investigate the literature and history of the United States from the era of slavery to the present. The course is a survey of American history and literature in which students will investigate each era in American history as defined by scholars in the field and documented in the State Standards. The purpose of the course is threefold. First, the course aims to provide students with the opportunity to gain broad knowledge of the American nation by focusing on political, cultural and economic factors that have influenced the course of events over the past 500 years in North America. Second, the course seeks to offer students the opportunity to acquire investigative skills necessary to evaluate a wide range of circumstances, synthesize effective solutions to problems, and evaluate outcomes. Third, the course offers the student-believer who covets the mind of Jesus Christ an opportunity to study and analyze the American past as a prophet who seeks the truth, a priest who honors the eternal in everyday life, and a king who refuses submission to the mindset of any god other than He who is identified as “Everlasting Father.” Each era of history will be revealed through simulated court cases. Each case will present a problem, controversy or significant issue in American history. The student will be given the responsibility to investigate the historical era and examine and use evidence of her/his research to build cases from various perspectives. These perspectives include, but are not limited to, the prosecution and defense (secondary sources), the witnesses (primary sources), and judge and jury (instructor and student views). Students will investigate and build arguments on all sides of the cases with the aim of understanding the complexity of the American story in a comprehensive and objective manner.

Economics Learn economic concepts by taking a tour of Econ City—a virtual city in which you will explore how government, businesses, and even your decisions impact the economy. You will learn what it means to make “values- led” economic decisions and how to make smart economic decisions about your future. This course utilizes a Biblical Christian worldview to survey basic theories and concepts related to the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

World History Presented through a “Windows of the World Museum,” World History gives students the opportunity to become the “curator” of a museum and visit the past, connect with the present, and look to the future. This course will also look at the world from the viewpoint of a Christian museum curator. Join others in the exploration of ancient and modern civilizations, their impact, and their contributions to today’s global society. Become a member of the global community as you open the windows and see the world. The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand their connections to the development of civilizations by examining the past to prepare for their future as participating members of a global community. Students will use knowledge pertaining to history, geography, economics, political processes, religion, ethics, diverse cultures, and humanities to solve problems in academic, civic, social, and employment settings.

American Government Students will learn about the role of citizens in a democracy, and how they can be active citizens who can influence government. Internet Web sites, discussions, and the use of various multimedia materials will provide students with opportunities to interact with the instructor, fellow classmates, and the community.

Global Studies What does it take to live in a complex and increasingly interdependent global society? It takes knowledge and skills that help you understand the people in this world God has created, their environments and issues. As a cub-reporter for God’s News Network, your assignment is to learn about and participate in global decisions that affect us and missionaries throughout the world through problem-based learning from a Biblical worldview.

Foreign Languages

Spanish I This first Spanish course provides an introduction to the Spanish language and to the culture of Hispanic countries, with the primary focus being on Spain. By encouraging sensitivity to, and understanding of, the cultures, life styles, and philosophies of Spanish-speaking peoples, the program of study develops language skills. Communicating authentically and excellently enables us to participate in God’s redemptive plan for all cultures. These language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing will enable the student to communicate and participate in Spanish communities at home and around the world. You will make connections to other areas of study by examining the way in which the Spanish language and culture has influenced their way of life and their own native culture. These connections, and the comparisons the students make with their own culture and language, will help to prepare the students for their role in a multi-lingual, global society, as well as for fruitful Christian service.  With a primary goal of communication, this course will provide ways for the students to exchange ideas on a variety of topics by speaking and writing in Spanish. They will be able to provide and obtain information about themselves, their schools, homes, churches, family, and friends. Through the use of language tool software, the virtual student will listen to the conversations of fellow students and the online instructor and will be able to respond in like manner. This Spanish I course is the first step in using a basic Spanish vocabulary. Acquiring the language skills and understanding of Hispanic way of life will be the beginning of a life-enriching experience.

Spanish II This Spanish II course provides a more in depth look at the Spanish language and to the culture of Hispanic countries. By encouraging sensitivity to, and understanding of, the cultures, life styles, and philosophies and worldviews of Spanish-speaking peoples, the program of study develops language skills. These language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing will enable the student to communicate and participate in Spanish communities at home and around the world. You will make connections to other areas of study by examining the way in which the Spanish language and culture has influenced their way of life and their own native culture. These connections, and the comparisons the students make with their own culture and language, will help to prepare the students for their role in a multi-lingual, global society. With a primary goal of communication, this course will provide ways for the students to exchange ideas on a variety of topics by speaking and writing in Spanish. They will be able to provide and obtain information about themselves, their schools, homes, family, friends, and faith. Through the use of language tool software, the virtual student will listen to the conversations of fellow students and the on-line instructor and will be able to respond in like manner. This Spanish II course is the second step in using a basic Spanish vocabulary. Acquiring the language skills and understanding of Hispanic way of life will be the beginning of a life-enriching experience.

Spanish III This third year of Spanish is a continuation of the first two years.  The student will continue to sharpen listening; speaking, reading and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction.  Throughout the five units of material (Feelings, Transportation, Work, Countries and the Future), students learn to express themselves using an ever increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, past-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives.  Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the Spanish speaking world and their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course is aligned to the national Foreign Language standards.

Course Objectives Throughout this semester, the student will:

  • Talk about how they get to different places and explore various modes of transportation available in the Spanish speaking world.
  • Talk about other countries and nationalities.
  • Learn Spanish history and history having to do with the Spanish speaking world.
  • Talk about jobs and professions one can have.
  • Learn to talk about the future using the future tense.
  • Talk about how people feel using a wide variety of adjectives and expressions.
  • express the conditional, talking about what would happen

Latin I Building the Via Latina: You are about to build a Roman road, the Via Latina. This road will be the foundation for your study of Latin and the culture of ancient Rome. Famous Romans from the past have agreed to be your supervisors. They will invite you to dinner, regale you with stories from mythology, introduce you to other Romans, show you around their homes, entertain you at the chariot races or the gladiatorial fights, and give you a look at what it meant to be a Roman: politically, socially, and economically. They will also be interested in hearing about your life as a Believer and how your worldview influences how you see Roman life and culture. Your task is to learn Latin, the language of the Romans. So let’s start the building process and find out how different, and yet how similar, our worlds really are.

Latin II Welcome, movie star! You will continue your journey to the time of the ancient Romans, but this time you will be the star in our movie, An Epic of Great Proportion. With your director, your script will include visits with some of the men who made Rome great. From them, you will learn about the Roman government and how Rome grew to rule most of the known world. Your epic movie will also take you back to the Trojan War where you will accompany the Greeks on a great adventure. Study your lines and get ready for “lights, camera, and action!”

Latin III Welcome to our world of Latin authors. In our library, you will sample some of the brightest minds of the Classical World. Through the literature of these authors you will learn more about the culture and history of the fabulous Romans. You will meet the great Julius Caesar and learn firsthand about his Gallic campaigns. Through the letters of Pliny the Younger, you will get a firsthand account of the eruption of Vesuvius. You will also meet the great orator, Cicero. The poets Martial, Catullus and Ovid will also share their works with you. Our special guest author will be the greatest of the Roman authors, Publius Vergilus Naso.

Chinese I This is a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of Mandarin Chinese (Simplified). In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction. Throughout the five units of material (Introduction to Chinese, Greetings, Calendar, Weather, and Time), students learn to express themselves using an ever increasing vocabulary. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the Chinese speaking world and their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course is aligned to the national Foreign Language standards. In this course, the learner will learn to do the following, at the beginning level:

  • Learn to appreciate other cultures.
  • Familiar with the Chinese phonological system
  • Familiar with greetings in Chinese
  • Know Chinese numbers
  • Express likes and dislikes.
  • Talk about themselves
  • Talk about calendar.
  • Talk about the weather.
  • talk about the time
  • Ask and respond to simple questions on basic topics.
  • Write and type words in Chinese and pronounce words appropriately.
Chinese II This course is a continuation of a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of language learning.  In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction.  Throughout the five units of material (Daily Routine, Animals, Hobbies, The Body and Descriptions), students learn to express themselves using an ever increasing vocabulary,  present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives.  Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course in an attempt to help the learner focus on the Chinese speaking world and their culture, people, geographical locations and histories. The course is aligned to the national Foreign Language standards.
Throughout the course, students will

  • talk about what they like to do in their free time
  • talk about their daily activities using a wide range of vocabulary and reflexive verbs
  • talk about animals and things animals do
  • talk about the parts of their body and their function
  • describe people

Electives

ESL   This course is engaging and encouraging when it comes to learning oral English as a principal means to communicate with those around you. Going at your own pace, you will be part of interactive media activities and assignments that will elevate your level of speaking and understanding the English language. Using Cambridge Standard English, you will be able to be part of meaningful lessons and assessments that can be completed anywhere and at anytime.  You will be also exposed to Canadian and Christian culture as you learn English. There are 5 levels and specific ESl courses for those with Spanish, Chinese, Korean backgrounds.  There is also a course for those that grew up speaking other languages.  Find out more at:  http://www.sevenstaracademy.org/ESL/.

 

Health (Life Management Skills) Signposts are everywhere in life, sending us in either positive or negative directions. Join us as we follow the signposts in Life Management Skills, and learn to use a biblical worldview to develop the skills for healthy, effective, and godly living. In this course you will have an opportunity to develop or enhance life management skills important in making godly decisions for healthy and effective living. Through the study of real life issues, the goal is for you to form healthy attitudes and behaviors that promote personal development, health and well being, so you can glorify God with your lives and experience His pleasure when you live according to His Word.

ACT Prep Based on your performance on the Diagnostic test, our system will create a personalized study schedule for you. As you learn, our system continues to adapt and adjust your schedule on your behalf. Every Lesson, Quiz, and Test you need to do is accessible every time you login from this week-by-week schedule. Multimedia flash lessons allow you to learn in the way best suited to your needs and preferences. Watch narrated video lessons or read text-based lessons at your own pace. Want to walk through that math problem again? Just slide the progress bar back and listen to it again! Our program uses full length tests from the Official ACT Guide so you get the most realistic practice possible. In addition, we offer dozens of practice quizzes to reinforce what you’ve learned. Your personalized schedule will automatically tell you when to do quizzes and on which weeks you should attempt a full length practice test.

SAT Prep Tired of the old workbook-based SAT Prep courses? Grab your duffel bag or backpack and prepare for a trip through test tips and strategies necessary for the SAT. Join the quest for higher scores with the Florida Virtual School SAT Prep course. This course is designed to strengthen the student’s test-taking skills so as to enhance his/her scores on the Scholastic Assessment Test. Students will practice thinking strategies, become thoroughly familiar with the structure of standardized exams, and build verbal competence and mathematics reasoning. Each student can contact an instructor to receive personalized lessons and guidance as he/she pursues higher test score goals.

Thinking and Learning Strategies This course will prepare students to succeed on reading, math and writing assessments. Through reading, writing, and math activities, students will develop their critical thinking skills and test-taking strategies. The objectives of this course go beyond mere test preparation. In addition to becoming familiar with the common test formats, question-types, and rubrics, students will develop the critical thinking skills they will need to succeed in the 21st century.  Since we believe God has designed each student with special gifts and talents, the course is set up with motivational quotes from a biblical world view.  It is common in today’s world for a student to be faced with worldly advice concerning self-esteem.  We, however, offer a fresh view of God-esteem, one which will help the student see beyond themselves and look to godly advice from the Bible and other Christians. Students will use a variety of learning methods in this course including scoring rubrics, self-assessments, practice tests, and learning log entries. While most of the course will be based upon independent practice, students will have opportunities to interact with their classmates through synchronous chats and discussion board activities.

Personal Fitness (PE) In this Personal Fitness course, students are required to participate in weekly cardiovascular, flexibility and strength and endurance activities. Spiritual application to the physical exercises will be made, along with relationships to biblical character qualities to be developed. Students who are unable to participate in such physical exercises will be unable to complete the requirements of this course. Students who have an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) or some other physical limitation that prevents them from participating in physical activity should seek to enroll in an Adaptive Physical Education course.

Computing for College and Career “What can you do for us?”  You’re applying for a job, and you really need a good answer to that question.  After completing this course, you will have a complete package of marketable skills that will make you a highly attractive job candidate. Can you use business-related computer software?  Can you communicate effectively with your boss and coworkers?  Can you look and sound like a valuable asset to your employer?  Do you know what you are really good at?  Being able to answer “yes!” to these and many other questions is the essential foundation for your career. The purpose of this course is to guide you in building your career foundation.  You will learn how to turn your computer into an effective tool for communication.  You will learn how to create positive working relationships.  And you will acquire the kinds of essential business skills needed for any successful career.  Productive employees need both technology and people skills.  Find both here in Computing for College and Career.

Digital Photography In the digital photography and graphic design lessons, students begin by learning general photographic concepts. Then composition skills are added to photographs and image-editing techniques are practiced. Students learn how to use layers, crop images, color and lighting concepts, hue and saturation, and exposures and special effects. Graphic design, artistic elements, and software skills are taught while producing graphic images. The concept of design as a manner of visual communication is carried throughout. Students build a portfolio of work and explore the fields of photography, graphic arts, advertising and illustration.  Students will explore ways to use their digital talent to the service of God.

Flash Animation This course is for anyone who wants to create animations and interactive movies like the ones used on the coolest Web sites. Participants learn how to use Flash 8 – the world’s most popular animation software – to create engaging, interactive movies for the Web. Beginning with classic animation techniques, participants learn how to move objects around the screen and change their appearance. From there, it’s on to creating movies complete with original artwork. By the end of the course, participants have learned how to build interactivity into their movies and publish them to the Web. This course is a great introduction to the world of Web animation, which will enable students to deliver biblical messages with the power they deserve.

 

Advanced Placement (AP)

AP Art History

This course will provide students with college level instruction in the history of art. Students will examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and present and from a variety of cultures. Students will learn to look at these works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate what they see or experience in light of a Christian worldview. Students will able to identify the presence or absence of Biblical truth reflected in art and architecture through the centuries.

AP Biology

You will use The Biology Place, Virtual Labs, and Biology: Concepts and Connections to complete the AP Biology course. Throughout this course you will be expected to explore many on-line sites, answer questions, reflect on issues and complete lab activities. The primary emphasis is to develop an understanding of concepts rather than memorizing terms and technical details. Remember this course requires a great deal of self-discipline and motivation. The ultimate goal of this course is to prepare you to successfully take the AP Biology examination offered in May.

AP Calculus

An interactive text, graphing software, and math symbol software combine with exciting on-line course delivery to make Calculus an adventure. Students will explore the meaning and practical applications of the derivative and the integral. Along the way, they will be challenged to deepen their Faith by reflecting on what it means to love God with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength. This course is designed to prepare the student for the AP Calculus AB exam, given each year in May. An Advanced Placement (AP) course in calculus consists of a full high school year of work that is comparable to a semester college calculus course. It is expected that students who take an AP course in calculus will seek college credit, college placement, or both, from institutions of higher learning.

AP Chemistry 

Advanced Placement Chemistry is equivalent to a full-year introductory college course in general Chemistry. Student will learn fundamental analytical skills to logically assess chemical problems proficiently, based on a Christian worldview. Through fascinating and elaborative lessons, students will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions based on informed judgment and present evidence in clear and persuasive essays.

AP Computer Science A

Students will play the role of a “survivor” while they work their way through the course material. AP Computer Science A is a college-level computer course covering the applications of computing within the context of programming methodology, algorithms, and data structures. This is a one-year course and students will be able to take the College Board Computer Science A examination in May. The computer language that will be used is Java which is a free download for either a Macintosh or a Windows platform.

AP English Language and Composition

An AP course in English Language and Composition actively engages students in reading literature from differing historical periods, multiple genres, controversial views, and rhetorical contexts. Students need to become writers who use their language effectively to communicate. Because this course is offered in a Christian worldview framework, the student is also challenged to read and write from the standpoint of integrating their Faith, beliefs, and values in support of or in contrast to the authors’ views. Students are expected to draw upon previously learned generic conventions as well as explore differentiating techniques to improve their reading and writing skills.

AP English Literature

The purpose of this course is to actively engage students in reading literature from differing historical periods, multiple genres, controversial views, and rhetorical contexts. Students will learn to use the modes of discourse and recognize the assumptions underlying various rhetorical strategies. Students will also acquire an understanding of language resources and the writer’s craft. Because this course is offered in a Christian worldview framework the student is also challenged to read and write from the standpoint of integrating their faith, beliefs, and values in support of or in contrast to the authors’ views. They will develop critical standards for the appreciation of many literary works and increase their sensitivity to literature as a shared experience. Students need to become writers who use their language effectively to communicate. Students are expected to draw upon previously learned generic conventions as well as explore differentiating techniques to improve their reading and writing skills.

 

AP Macroeconomics

You have been called upon to assist the leader of the Macro Islands who is running for reelection next year. The economy is in shambles, and you need to come up with some feasible solutions. This will not only help the people of the Macro Islands but will also ensure a victory for your employer. You were hired over the Internet and received a first class ticket to the Macro Islands where you can learn first-hand about the situation. You arrive at Pineapple Airport in the middle of the day and are met by a man with a briefcase who is holding a sign with your name on it. You approach the man and introduce yourself. “I’m Mr. Scarcity,” he says. “I’ll be your guide as you learn about the economic situation of the islands. You need to learn everything you can about both macroeconomics and our Macro Islands for your presentation to our island leader in May.” (Your AP Exam.)

AP Microeconomics

Prepare to earn college credits while learning all the essential concepts required by the College Board as YOU travel to Macro Islands to assist the leader in winning reelection. While you go there for a job, you will soon realize that you love the islands and want to make your home there. Because you are adept at giving economic advice to the leader, you will be appointed as the new President of the Sunny Sea Shell Company.  As a practicing Christian you will also be expected to give advice that affirms the truth of the Bible as it applies to the field of economics. As part of your role in assuming the leadership duties of the company, you will need to brush up on microeconomics as well as the biblical principles that are foundational to its study. The Board of Directors has appointed Ms. Equilibrium to act as your personal assistant and advisor as you transition into your new role. You will be learning all you can about microeconomics and will be required to exhibit your knowledge in May at the annual Board of Director’s meeting (the AP Exam).

During your stay, Ms. Equilibrium will ask you to complete assignments showing that you understand the information and that you are the right person for the job. In addition, you will often be asked to demonstrate your ability to apply biblical principles to the field of microeconomics.  These assignments will take the form of: discussion postings, oral quizzes, self check assignments, instructor graded assignments, and exams. You will find these lessons and assignments in the course’s 6 modules.

AP US Government

“Lights, Camera, Action!”  Prepare to study the intricacies of the American Political Culture. The script is written and the actors participate daily in the drama of American politics. You will be “on location” to delve into primary source documents. You will go behind the scenes with stars such as the President, Congress, and Supreme Court Justices. You will research the roles of the media, political parties, interest groups, states, candidates, bureaucracy, and the public in the governmental process. You will witness the large- scale production of policy building in the areas of economic/social policy, foreign policy and public administration.  Throughout, you will engage a biblically-informed Christian worldview as you evaluate new information.  You will learn about the nature of U.S. Government and Politics including the basics of political participation. Internet websites, discussions, and the use of various multimedia materials will provide students with opportunities to interact with the instructor, fellow classmates, and the community. Topics that will be studied include:

  • the basis of democracy
  • the role of politics in U.S. Government
  • the three branches of government
  • civil rights and civil liberties
  • policymaking

AP US History

Advanced Placement United States History is a college level course. It is meant to introduce students to the major points throughout American history from the Colonial period to the present. Students are required to show competency in critically evaluating primary and secondary sources. Students will be taught how to best succeed in the AP exam held in May while gaining a thorough understanding of American history.  Believer-students who covet the mind of Jesus Christ will be offered an opportunity to study and analyze the American past as a prophet who seeks the truth, a priest who honors the eternal in everyday life, and as a king who refuses submission to the mindset of any god other than HE who is identified as “Everlasting Father.”

AP World History 

AP World History covers the history of the world from 600 C.E. to the present with an introduction unit on the period before (covering around 8000 B.C.E. to 600 C.E.). The course emphasizes “patterns of change” and the connections between the various world cultures throughout the time period being studied. Students will gain an understanding of the global experiences of humanity and be able to apply that knowledge to their growth and development as “citizens of eternity”.

The class has two major goals: (1) to prepare students to be successful on the AP World History exam and (2) to provide students with an understanding on why the world developed the way it did.

Dual Credit (College Credit) CoursesSemester-long courses worth 3 credit hours each

Dual Credit Courses Offered through Davis College (NY)

Business

Accounting for Managers  (Organizational Mgmt)
Management use of accounting data for planning and control; theories and practice of cost accounting and analysis of data for management decision making. The course includes cost behavior analysis, cost-volume-profit analysis, responsibility accounting, budgeting and performance measurement, and pricing decisions.

 

Cutting Issues in Management  (Organizational Mgmt)
A modular course for managers allowing them to build upon the principles of management to study the current trends and developments in the field of management as found in business currently and in the thinking of writers in the field.

 

Legal Implications for Business  (Organizational Mgmt)
A basic explanation of the law-its sources, development, terminology-and a discussion of specific legal doctrines and principles which affect business, with an introduction to business organizations such as corporations and partnerships, criminal contracts, legal documents and property.

 

Macroeconomics  (Organizational Mgmt)
A study of macroeconomic theory with a primary emphasis placed upon an examination of economic aggregates, including topics such as supply and demand, the market process, the economic role of government, measuring the nation’s economic performance, unemployment, economic fluctuations, fiscal policy, money and the banking system, economic growth, international trade, and foreign exchange markets.

 

Microeconomics  (Organizational Mgmt)
A study of microeconomic theories of supply and demand, price determination, resource allocation, various degrees of competition and international trade and finance, as well as exploration of applications such as income inequality, rural and urban economics, social control of industry, and labor unions.

 

Organizational Marketing and Sales  (Organizational Mgmt)
The use of organizational mission to develop a marketing approach to reach potential constituencies with image, product and service that will cause those constituencies to utilize the organization to meet their perceived needs in a manner that is profitable to the organization.

Communications

Communication Concepts  (General Education)
An introduction to the concepts of effective oral and written communication to include functioning in teams and other organizational settings as well as interpersonal exchanges.

 

Essentials of Speech  (General Education)
The principles of speech composition, outlining and delivery are discussed. There is practice in preparing and presenting speeches that can inform, persuade, demonstrate, and actuate. The student will be encouraged to make immediate application of principles within the current work environment.

English

Comp and Grammar  (General Education)A review of the basics of the composition forms used in written language and the proper use of grammar in both written and oral forms.
Comp and Reading I  (General Education)
This course is an exercise in critical reading and thinking and effective strategies of persuasion. It is also a study of paragraph and composition structure, focusing on expository and persuasive writing as well as the “rhetorical modes” with their use individually and cooperatively.
Linguistics  (General Education)
This course is an introduction to linguistics and linguistic theory. It is specifically designed to provide a basic understanding of linguistics and practice with some of its applications to students who are not linguists, but who realize the need for familiarity with the fundamentals of linguistic theory in order to help them practice their profession.
Structure of the English Language  (General Education)
This course is a survey of the important structure, grammar and syntax of the English language that is essential for non-native speakers to know. The course will teach idiosyncrasies of each language group and how that affects learning English. A variety of techniques used in teaching language structure will be explored.

Ethics

Case Studies in Ethics  (Organizational Mgmt)
Reading, discussion and development of papers pertaining to relevant case studies and readings involving ethical issues applied to actual situations.

 

Christian Ethics  (Bible-Related)
A study of theoretical and practical problems of moral conduct and proposed solutions with an emphasis upon the nature of ethics, values, rights, obligations and opportunities.

 

Ethical Decisions in the Workplace  (Organizational Mgmt)
The development, discussion and resolution of ethical issues in organizations and how outcomes are impacted by ethical standards and Christian faith.

General

Christianity in 21st Century  (Bible-Related)
A study of major issues facing the church as it enters the new century with emphasis upon the key problems that both Protestant and Roman Catholic churches are wrestling with and trends that are likely to develop. The study will consider the Sermon on the Mount from the teaching of Jesus to determine how Christians ought to deal with these issues.

 

Thinking Like Jesus: Foundations for Bib Worldview  (Bible-Related)
This course is designed to help students understand the meaning of worldview, and its importance in the life of a Christian. The worldviews of modern culture will be examined and evaluated in light of biblical truth. Students will understand the foundations of a biblical world view by studying appropriate passages of Scripture, especially those that relate to the life and teachings of Jesus.

 

Understand & Apply Bible  (Bible-Related)
A study of the process that led to the creation of the English Bible and its authority, a survey of the principles and practice of independent Bible study, including an emphasis on the grammatical historical approach to biblical interpretation. The student will study methods of application leading to the development of theme, proposition and finally the lesson itself.

History

Church History I  (Bible-Related)
A study of the history of the Christian Church from its founding on the day of Pentecost to the beginning of the Reformation with special emphasis upon the people, events and doctrinal controversies that were significant in the growth of Christianity.

 

Church History II  (Bible-Related)
A study of the history of the Christian Church from the dawning of the Reformation to the present time with special emphasis upon the people, events and doctrinal controversies that were significant in the growth of Christianity.

 

History of Civilization  (General Education)
This course studies the development of the Western world and its institutions and ideas. The student will be challenged to consider the positive and negative impact of Western thinking and to formulate a sense of personal responsibility within society.

 

History of the Restoration Movement  (Bible-Related)
This course is a history of the Restoration Movement in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as it results in the Christian Churches/Churches of Christ. Special interest will be given to early leaders and guiding principles.

 

Western Civilization I  (General Education)
A study of the foundations of the modern world from the first civilizations through the 18th century. Topics include Western and non-Western classical civilizations, the Middle Ages and the age of absolutism.

 

  Western Civilization II  (General Education)
This course studies the development of the Western world and its institutions and ideas from the nineteenth century to the present. The student will be challenged to consider the positive and negative impact of Western thinking and to formulate a sense of personal responsibility within society.

Humanities

Cultural Anthropology  (General Education)
This course introduces you to the principles and practice of cultural anthropology. After class exploration of various methods and concepts, you will explore those insights practically in actual cross-cultural experiences.

 

Music Appreciation  (General Education)
The development of listening skills acquired through an understanding of musical building blocks and characteristics of style and form.

Leadership

Biblical Concepts of Leadership  (Bible-Related)
A study of the concepts of leadership in the context of Scripture and application of these concepts to personal, professional and career goals. The course will include the use of a survey to assess each individual’s leadership capabilities to help him/her to understand his/her personal profile.

 

Case Studies in Leadership  (Organizational Mgmt)
Case studies will be selected for in-depth study of the application of leadership concepts with particular reference to those concepts found in Scripture. Students will develop a written analysis of their style of leadership. Related issues are introduced through readings.

Literature

American Literature  (General Education)
American Literature acquaints the student with a process of reading, responding to, analyzing, interpreting and writing about three standard genres of American literature: short stories, poetry and plays. No prior literary study is assumed.

 

Literature of C. S. Lewis  (General Education)
The course will explore the life of and literature produced by C. S. Lewis in order to gain perception into his theology, the various genre in which he wrote, and the principles that make his writings meaningful nearly forty years after his death.

Management

Essentials of Management  (Organizational Mgmt)
A study of the five parts of managing organizations—planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling/evaluating—with the study of principles for application to both not-for-profit and for-profit organizations and applications in organizations with references to Scripture.

 

Organizational Behavior  (Organizational Mgmt)
Organizational goals, priorities and strategies interfacing with the behavior of individuals and groups inside the organization and in other affecting organizations. Attention is given to the effect of organizational culture, government laws and regulations and the economy upon organizational behavior.

 

Teams and the Work Process  (Organizational Mgmt)
The organization of work in the implementation of the strategic plan with work analyzed for how human efforts in teams and other small groups of various compositions and other structures can effectively bring that work to a quality level of completion as defined by the end-user.

Math

Applied College Algebra  (General Education)
An introduction to college mathematics is provided with an emphasis on business and work-world applications. Students will perform best in this course if they have a basic understanding of high school mathematics through Algebra. The goal of the course is to build a fundamental understanding of college algebra that is adequate to provide a level of competence expected of a college graduate.

Ministry

Purpose Driven Church  (Bible-Related)
This course will introduce the student to the literature, skills and philosophy that will enable him/her to lead in the planting of a new congregation. Using the Saddleback Valley Community Church as an example and the experience of a new church planter, the student will be led through the process and see the decisions this church made to grow into a vibrant congregation.

 

Small Groups in the Church  (Bible-Related)
This course will benefit anyone who participates in small groups, but it is specifically designed to help leaders understand the components of group process and enable them to fulfill their roles. The focus of the course is small groups in a church-based ministry, although many of the concepts and principles also apply to businesses and other organizations that are comprised of groups of people.

Missions

Evangelism Discipleship  (Bible-Related)
A study of the nature, purpose and process of biblical evangelism and its application to various ministries; a study of New Testament discipleship principles and their application, with a special emphasis upon building discipling relationships and small group ministry.

 

Foundations of Christian Missions  (Bible-Related)
This course is intended to provide an introductory overview of the basis for Christian missions and establish a biblical and theological foundation to adequately sustain a long-term mission enterprise. In addition, relevant cultural and historical perspectives are thoroughly examined toward the intent of motivating positive desires for involvement in mission endeavors.

 

Theology of Missions  (Bible-Related)
A study of the Word of God as set forth through God’s promise to Abraham to bless the nations through Jesus Christ and the Church; an application of the Word of God as it relates to the purposes, nature, scope and current challenges of cross-cultural missions.

New Testament

Acts  (Bible-Related)
A study of the Acts of the Apostles that specifically follows the historical expansion of the church through doctrinal development, growth in understanding, evangelism and geographical expansion through the missionary activities of its members. We will become acquainted with the activities of the great church leaders of the first century, e.g., Peter, James and Paul.

 

Life of Christ  (Bible-Related)
A study of the Life of Christ as recorded in the Synoptic Gospels and in the Gospel according to John.

 

New Testament Survey  (Bible-Related)
A survey of the New Testament including events in the life of Christ, the development of the early church, the work of the followers of Christ, and the influence on organizations and people in the first century.

 

Paul’s New Test Letters  (Bible-Related)
An overview of Paul’s writings to the first-century churches. This study highlights major issues and considers application to individual believers and churches of today. Appropriate hermeneutical principles and procedures are also demonstrated.

Old Testament

Ethics Hebrew Wisdom Lit  (Bible-Related)
A study of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Songs that emphasizes the genius of Hebrew poetry and the doctrinal depth, spiritual value and ethical implications of these books.

 

History of the Israelite Kingdom  (Bible-Related)
This course is a study of the history of the people of God in the Old Testament as that history is recorded from Genesis through Esther. It will consider God’s redemptive plan as it is expressed in His covenants with Israel. Special emphasis will be made to help the student understand the geography of the Near East.

Personal Development

Faith and Money  (General Education)
This class will teach the students what God says about handling money and possessions with a goal of the student learning to be financially free and spiritually free. A practical method of budgeting is included. It will also cover God’s principles of living honestly, being accountable, dealing with debt, giving, work, and eternity.

 

Goals Priorities Attitudes  (General Education)
The setting of goals, as well as priorities among those goals, with an emphasis upon how those goals and priorities relate to the realities and aspirations of life. The attitude of the individual including other aspects of psychological makeup and how it impacts upon the ability and willingness to set goals and priorities. An emphasis upon how goals, priorities and attitudes can lead to effective Christian personal management.

 

Skills for College Success  (General Education)
This course will focus on competency in the implementation of strategies for managing time, increasing reading comprehension, employing rules of grammar and usage, completing assignments, taking tests, writing essays, and using technology within the educational setting. Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to apply the new competencies to building a successful college career.

Science

Earth Science Introduction  (General Education)
Earth science including physical and historical geology, meteorology and descriptive astronomy; the economic, social and philosophic aspects of the subject matter.

 

  Earth Science Lab  (General Education)
This laboratory is comprised of learning activities and application exercises related Earth Sciences.

 

Intro to Life Science  (General Education)
This course introduces life science from a Christian worldview. Course topics include biological organization and hierarchy, energy and nutrient flow cycles, population biology, genetics and reproduction, and cellular biology.

Social Science

General Psychology  (General Education)
A study of the fundamental concepts of psychology including biological processes, development, behavior, learning and memory, personality, psychological disorders and social psychology.

 

Intro to Counseling  (General Education)
This course introduces the biblical principles of counseling and outlines the process by which Christian leaders can counsel people with specific problems. The course also provides an introduction to the counseling profession from a Christian perspective, explores how biblical and psychological principles may be integrated and applied to counseling issues, and describes the nature and role of the counselor as a person and as a professional.

 

Intro to Sociology  (General Education)
This course will introduce the student to the fundamental concepts of inter­relationships and group activities. Students will be able to integrate experience from his or her own life and work environments while studying the principles involved in dyadic groups, primary groups, secondary groups, institutions and society.

 

Social History of the 20th Century U.S.  (General Education)
A study of significant changes in American society during the twentieth century with emphasis on both famous and ordinary people who have made these changes happen. Among important topics are transportation, inventions, the economy, commerce, politics, family life and civil rights.

Theology

Biblical Worldview  (Bible-Related)
A study of the biblical worldview as presented in the Old and New Testaments. Use of the Scripture to explore the role of general revelation (the creation) and special revelation (the Scriptures) and to experience God at work in the modern world.

Worship

Worship in the Old Testament  (Bible-Related)
The study of God’s design for worship as found in the Old Testament and how it relates to Christian worship today in form, substance and appeal.

 

Worship: Early Christian Church to Present  (Bible-Related)
A study of how Christian worship has evolved beginning with the first-century church. An understanding of the various forms of worship over time including their relevance to current society.

 

Dual Credit Courses Offered through Indiana Wesleyan University (IN)

BIL 101 Old Testament Survey
A study of the Old Testament, highlighting the cultural background underlying the books of the Old Testament. Topics include major archaeological finds, Old Testament culture as it relates to today’s culture, and the foundational relationship between the Old Testament and the New Testament. An additional charge of $ 50 applies for a material and book fee.

BIL 102 New Testament Survey
This course covers the literature of the New Testament. Special attention will be given to the life of Christ and the history of the early church, including the life of Paul. An additional charge of $ 50 applies for a material and book fee.

Eng 140 Communications I
This course provides the student with a basic understanding of the elements involved in the writing process. It will help students develop an ability to express their ideas effectively in writing, analyze expository and persuasive writing techniques, and establish a solid foundation for researching and securing information required for productive writing. An additional charge of $140 applies for a material and book fee.

HIS 102 American Civilization after 1865
A survey of the political development of our nation with its internal and external crises; the progress of regional economies, cultures, the rise and impact of social involvement from the Great Awakening to post WWII generations, and the role of the US as a dominant player in world affairs. This is taught in a way that develops a Biblical Worldview. An additional charge of $60 applies for a material and book fee.

SOC 152 Social Problems
A study of issues in contemporary American society. Issues examined include crime, poverty, violence, racism, and sexism. Possible solutions and strategies to combat them are explored. This is taught in a way that develops a Biblical Worldview. A charge of $50 for a material and book fee.

PSY 155 Psychology of Personal Adjustment
This course encompasses a study of stress management and coping skills, the factors that contribute to self-esteem and the maintenance of healthy interpersonal relationships, and the skills required for successful conflict resolution. The course will focus on strategies for developing and maintaining positive mental health. A theoretical framework is presented. This is taught from a thoroughly Christian perspective. An additional charge of $100 applies for a material and book fee.

Dual Credit Courses Offered through God’s Bible School & College (OH)

New Testament Survey:
A survey of the New Testament including events in the life of Christ, the development of the early church, the work of the followers of Christ, and the influence on organizations and people in the first century.

Creation Apologetics:
This course involves participating in a 12-week online learning experience with Answers in Genesis, plus doing other readings/activities related to apologetics. The course will provide a firm foundation in the fundamental ideas of creation apologetics. Topics covered include: the nature of Noah’s flood, implications of death before sin, mutations and evolution, using logic to defend your faith, and a general argument for Christianity. At appropriate points in the course, some important concepts in biology and geology will be studied.

Math Concepts and Applications:
The development of mathematical concepts for application to the student’s work and daily life. A review of mathematical concepts including the basics of algebra and geometry.

English Composition I:
This course is an exercise in critical reading and thinking and effective strategies of persuasion. It is also a study of paragraph and composition structure, focusing on expository and persuasive writing as well as the “rhetorical modes” with their use individually and cooperatively.

Earth Science Introduction:
Earth science including physical and historical geology, meteorology and descriptive astronomy; the economic, social and philosophic aspects of the subject matter.

Earth Science Lab:
This laboratory is comprised of learning activities and application exercises related Earth Sciences.

Dual Credit Courses Offered through Taylor University (IN)

 

Biblical Studies

 

BIB 109E Old Testament Survey

A course that has as its primary content the Old Testament, with special attention given to the law, the prophets, and the history of Israel.

 

BIB 209E New Testament Survey

A course that includes a foundation in New Testament study with focus on Jesus Christ as portrayed in the gospels and epistles. Also included is a series of explorations into the relevancy of Christ to modern life.

 

BIB 213E Survey of Biblical Literature

A survey of the Bible, both Old and New Testaments, designed to help students learn the central ideas and themes of the Bible; to become familiar with its chief persons, places and events; to become aware of the types of biblical literature; and to develop the ability to study the Bible effectively.

 

BIB 216E Historical Books

This course is a study of the books of Joshua through Esther, with emphasis on biblical history, geography, chronology, and spiritual implications.

 

BIB 217E Genesis

A detailed study of the book of “beginnings”, giving attention to its authorship, authenticity, chronology, and spiritual implication.

 

BIB 218E Matthew

A detailed study of the purpose, structure, and theology of Matthew’s gospel, with special emphasis on titles and teachings of Jesus, significant events in His life, and the application of the gospel to the present time.

 

BIB 271E Inductive Study of the Bible

Specific methods are taught to enable the students to understand the propositions of the biblical text, relate those propositions to one another, and ask questions of the text in order to discover what the biblical writers meant to convey through their writings.

 

BIB 273E Bible Study and Interpretation

This course is an introduction to the science and art of how to interpret the Bible. While theoretical issues will be discussed, emphasis will be placed on specific rules and methods for interpreting the varieties of Biblical literature, such as narratives, poetry, and prophecy. The course will also include an introduction to Hebrew and Greek language tools for the English Bible student.

 

 

RK 203E Elementary New Testament Greek I

A beginning grammar of New Testament Greek in which nouns, adjectives, and prepositions, as well as the present and future indicative verbs, are introduced. This course has no online component and is taught through correspondence.

 

GRK 204E Elementary New Testament Greek II

A continuation of GRK 203E in which imperfect aorist and perfect indicative verbs, as well as participles, infinitives, and non-indicative moods are introduced. This course has no online component and is taught through correspondence.

 

GRK 205E Elementary New Testament Greek III

A continuation of GRK 203E and GRK 204E. This course has no online component and is taught through correspondence.

 

HEB 202E Elementary Old Testament Hebrew I

A study of the fundamentals of accidence and basic syntax of Biblical Hebrew. A review of selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament. This course has no online component and is taught through correspondence.

 

HEB 203E Elementary Old Testament Hebrew II

A continuation of the study of fundamental principles of Old Testament Hebrew. Prerequisite: student must have completed HEB 202E or equivalent to take this class. This course has no online component and is taught through correspondence.

 

HEB 204E Elementary Old Testament Hebrew III

A continuation of the study of fundamental principles of Old Testament Hebrew. Prerequisite: student must have completed HEB 202E and HEB 203E or equivalent to take this class. This course has no online component and is taught through correspondence.

 

Business

 

BUA 230E Principles of Marketing

A study of the many facets involved in the field of marketing. Emphasis is given to both the modern marketing system in today’s international economy and to the marketing strategies of an organization. Topics include types of markets, market segmentation methods, product and service strategies, product planning, new product development, distribution channels, sales, advertising and pricing. Special emphasis is given to applications in international service and nonprofit disciplines.

 

BUA 241E Accounting Principles I

An introduction to the language of business. Financial transactions are analyzed, recorded, summarized, and reported in a meaningful manner to management. Also studied are basic financial statements and the various accounting and internal procedures for recording and protecting assets.

 

BUA 242E Accounting Principles II

A continuation of BUA 241E. Accounting problems and procedures pertaining to partnerships and corporations are studied. Also studied are various accounting procedures and reports used by management in acquiring fixed assets, budgeting and controlling manufacturing and departmental operations, reporting financial conditions, and analyzing the results of operations.

 

ECO 201E Principles of Microeconomics

An introduction to microeconomics, emphasizing decision making by individual producers and consumers, consequences of such decisions for efficiency of resource use, and income distribution in a capitalistic economy are studied.

 

Communication

 

CAS 110E Public Speaking

Concentrates on the development of public speaking skills including audience, analysis, library research, organization, the use of evidence to support a point of view, delivery, and listening.

 

CAS 120E Interpersonal Communication

The study of self-esteem, empathic listening, emotion, language, nonverbal behavior, conflict, and ethics in interpersonal relationships.

 

Computers

 

CIS 104E Introduction to Computers and Information Technology

This course is a study of computing issues and information technology designed to provide a foundation for future course work and vocational experiences. The course involves two major components: computing and information technology concepts; and computer software applications. Student access to MS Office required for participation in this class.

 

CIS 111E Introduction to Computers and Information Technology Ethics

This course discusses technology and the role of Christians as computer users or professionals. Topics include the philosophical and religious foundations of computer ethics theories, electronic privacy issues, intellectual property rights, computer system security, and personal accountability.

 

Criminal Justice

 

JUS 100E Introduction to Criminal Justice

A survey of the organization, administration, and function of law enforcement, the courts, and corrections in an historical, legal, and contemporary context. Emphasis is placed on both offenses and offenders at each stage of the process.

 

 

 

JUS 120E American Policing

An introductory course on legal, theoretical, historical, and organizational foundations of law enforcement in the United States with a critical assessment of alternative police policies and practices.

 

JUS 200E Correctional Chaplaincy

An overview of correctional chaplaincy as it functions in jails, prisons, and community-based settings. The course will examine the structure of chaplaincy within the justice system, explore the characteristics of effective ministry in the institutional setting and relate the role of chaplaincy to larger issues of restorative justice within the community. Attention will also be given to understanding the emerging model of chaplaincy for the 21st century.

 

JUS 230E Restorative Justice

A study of a biblical model of justice and how it can be applied to the current criminal justice system, focusing on the restoration of harms caused by crime to the victims, community, and offender, examining the responsibilities of each in the restorative process and the role of the Christian community in implementing changes.

 

JUS 240E Corrections

A study of the organization and administration of adult corrections with special emphasis on institutions and incarceration. Correctional theories, policies, and practices are considered in an historical and contemporary context.

 

Education

 

CED 219E Ministry to Children

A study of ministry methods, program structures, and evaluation for all ages of children within the church. The student will learn principles of effective and creative programming designed to help children with their needs.

 

CED 223E Ministry to Adults

A study of the psychological and spiritual needs of adults to establish proper objectives for adult Christian education. Attention is given to programming the new methods designed to enhance the spiritual growth process among adults.

 

EDU 110E History and Philosophy of Education in America

The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of how philosophy and worldviews have impacted education in America. The course emphasizes the influences of the Christian faith on education, including within the public school system.

 

 

EDU 115E Teaching about Religion in the Public Schools

It is constitutional and necessary for a sound education to teach about religion in public schools. Teaching about religion is not religious indoctrination or religious devotional exercise; it is fair and objective presentation of the history and beliefs of religions and the study of the influence of religion on human society. This course examines the historical, constitutional, and scholarly foundations for such teaching. It explores how teachers can practically incorporate teaching about religion into their classes in a constitutionally and age-appropriate manner.

 

 

EDU 203E Introduction to Special Education

This course is an introduction to special education and is designed to ensure that students explore alternative ways of viewing, understanding, and teaching the exceptional child. Students will be introduced to various topics that will focus on legislation, regulations, inclusion, least restrictive environment, eligibility for special education services, and evaluation.

 

EDU 260E Educational Psychology

The study and application of learning theories and psychological concepts and principles to the teaching-learning process. The teacher’s responsibility to handicapped students is explored. Cognitive, affective and psychomotor aspects of the teaching-learning process are considered. Other topics included are statistics, tests and measurement, motivation and classroom management. Includes a field experience lab.

 

English

 

ENG 110E Expository Writing

Practice in writing clear and effective prose through several expository modes including a formal research paper. A brief review of grammar and mechanics as necessary, with concentration on analytical thinking.

 

ENG 217E Bible as Literature
This course will study the use of literary tools (such as narrative, poetry, proverbs, rhetoric, dialogue, and allusion) in the Bible. The study of these literary qualities, coupled with a study of representative passages in the biblical text, will give students a richer understanding of God’s Word. Students will be asked to consider carefully the assumptions they use when studying the Bible from a literary point of view.

 

ENG 240E American Literature

A survey of American literary tradition from its origin to the present.

 

ENG 250E British Literature

Explores British literature from its beginnings to the present, including a brief historical overview of the development of the English language.

 

Fine Arts

 

ART 172E Art Appreciation

A study of art through a historical survey. This course introduces the student to the great masters and art periods of the past while broadening the student’s appreciation and understanding of art.

 

MUS 121E Music Fundamentals: Beginners

A course designed for the musical novice. It provides an understanding and correct usage of basic tools of the printed musical page. It covers an in-depth study of note reading, intervals, major scales, minor scales, and primary chords. This course has no online component and is taught through correspondence.

 

MUS 122E Music Fundamentals: Intermediate

A course involving more advanced study of the tools of music and their use. It is designed to follow MUS 121E. The course includes an advanced study of scales, chords, intervals, melody writing, and harmonization. Prerequisite: MUS 121E Music Fundamentals: Beginners or permission of the instructor. This course has no online component and is taught through correspondence.

 

MUS 149E Music Appreciation

An introduction to the art of music and its materials. A course designed to develop greater understanding and appreciation of music and the various historical periods. Considerable attention is given to listening to recordings and studying the lives of leading composers. Note: Attendance at two concerts required.

 

MUS 243E Music and World Cultures

A course that introduces students to ways to think about how people make music meaningful and useful in their lives and presents basic musical concepts as they are practiced in musical systems around the world. Diverse music (both traditional and popular) and cultural contexts are introduced. Focus is given to cultural and music basics as well as to the analysis of musical examples from the respective cultures.

 

General Studies

 

IAS 102E Orientation to Distance Learning

This course is an introduction to Blackboard, TU Online history and staff, and University policies that pertain to the distance learner. An overview of learning styles and time management strategies make up the content of the course which is supplemented by John Stott’s Your Mind Matters. Student will use Blackboard communication tools to complete assignments.

 

IAS 103E Prior Learning Portfolio Development

An introduction to the development of a Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) portfolio. The PLA portfolio is a student-prepared document, compiled and assembled in an approved format which demonstrates college-level knowledge gained through professional training and lifelong learning experiences. Course enrollment restricted to degree-seeking Taylor University students.

 

 

IAS 112E Foundations of Christian Thought

An introduction to the liberal arts and the integration of faith and learning. The approach of this course is to use the central theme of human nature to introduce the student to basic areas of understanding which gird the intellectual growth process. Topics include worldviews, ways of knowing, and ethics, with applications made to the modern world. A variety of liberal arts subjects are used in the course including science, social science, and literature.

 

PHP 100E Fitness for Life

A course on the importance of wellness, including the spiritual basis, and how individuals can achieve a state of wellness in their lives. Content includes the health-related components of physical fitness, hypokinetic diseases, nutrition, AIDs and sexuality, substance abuse, cancer, and stress management. Students are expected to engage in a program of regular physical activity during this course and a battery of tests is given to assess each student’s level of physical fitness.

 

PHP 200E Individualized Physical Education

This course provides the opportunity to develop and implement a physical fitness program to meet your specific needs and desires for a healthy lifestyle.

 

History

 

HIS 101E World History I

A survey of the history and culture of early times from the beginning of civilization through the Reformation. Special attention is given to cultural traits, customs, and institutions that make up civilized ways of life. Cultures and political developments are studied against the primary worldview of each civilization.

 

HIS 102E World History II

A study of modern civilization from 1650 to present, including industrial and political revolutions; democracy; development of modern thought, art and literature; growth of the Americas; European and American contacts with the Orient; the World Wars and their aftermath. Special attention is given to the interplay of culture, the rise of new social and political ideas, and the influence of modern science.

 

HIS 122E United States History I

A survey of the United States history from the colonial days through the end of the Civil War. Particular attention is given to geographic expansion and the development of political, social, religious, and economic institutions.

 

HIS 123E United States History II

A continuation of the survey of the United States history from Civil War to present.

 

Mathematics

 

MAT 100E Fundamentals of Math

A study of the basic arithmetic operations, exponents, ratios, linear and quadratic equations, graphs, and story problems. This course is specifically designed to assist those students who need help for the mathematics proficiency examination. Students taking this course must pass the mathematics proficiency exam to pass the course.

 

MAT 110E Finite Mathematics

A study of selected topics from set theory, matrices, systems of linear equations and inequalities, linear programming, counting and probability, statistics, and mathematics of finance.

 

Ministry

 

CMI 122E Evangelism and Discipleship

A study of the principles of lifestyle evangelism and one-on-one discipleship. In addition to written assignments, practical experience is employed. Some memorization of Scripture required.

 

CMI 220E Personal Evangelism
A study of biblical ways and modern methods to share the gospel in the context of the church’s commission to reach unbelievers and to develop witnesses.

 

PMI 111E Christian Worship

An analysis of the principles of biblical worship. Including a strong focus on the role of music along with a study of creative worship alternatives and the development of curricular writing skills.

 

PMI 251E The Practice of Pastoral Ministry

A basic course for pastors. This course looks at the pastor’s call, his work in the church, and his personal life. Particular emphasis is given to the pastor’s study and pulpit ministry.

 

 

YMI 200E Ministry to Youth

An introduction to the biblical basis for focused ministry to teenagers both ecumenically and evangelically including biblical understanding, adolescent development, program implementation, parental involvement, staff training and development, and effective budgeting.

 

YMI 225E Youth Camping
An introduction to youth camping as a ministry tool of the local church. Exploration and analysis of the biblical foundation, historic beginnings, and contemporary trends of youth camping and their application to young people, camp staff, and the local church.

Philosophy

 

PHI 110E Introduction to Philosophy

A survey of important issues and traditions in philosophy.

 

PHI 201E Logic

A study of classical and contemporary formulations of the principles of human thought. Proper deductive and inductive logic is contrasted with fallacies. Categorical logic, truth functional logic, and quantificational logic are examined.

 

PHI 262E Contemporary Issues

A systematic analysis of pressing issues such as sexual morality, divorce, abortion, homosexuality, euthanasia, and war and peace.

 

Psychology

 

PSY 200E General Psychology

An introduction to the subject matter and methods of psychology. Topics considered include human development, personality, learning, sensation, perception, motivation, emotion, mental health, and social psychology.

 

PSY 240E Child Psychology

This course deals not only with the subject matter of developmental psychology (such as cognitive development, physical development, and socio-emotional development) but also attempts to apply the subject matter to those actively working with children such as parents, teachers, coaches, etc.

 

PSY 247E Lifespan Development

This course is designed to provide a general overview of the developmental process in humans from conception through death. Included is attention to the physical, emotional, cognitive, and social developments.

 

PSY 272E Research in Psychology

Research methods in psychology are studied and critiqued. Students are involved in practical research and writing assignments.

 

Religion

 

REL 107E Christian Canon

This course will bring the student through a study of the production, collection, and transmissions of the Holy Scriptures including attention to the various historic English translations and their backgrounds.

 

REL 225E Modern Cults

A course designed to enable the Christian workers to identify and meet the specious arguments of modern cults. The history, methods, growth and policies of modern cults are studied with special emphasis on how to deal with those threatened or ensnared by them.

 

REL 227E Perspectives on the World Christian Movement

An introduction to the theology, history, strategy, and priorities of contemporary evangelical mission work.

 

 

Science

 

BIO 105E Biological Science Survey

An introduction to basic observations, hypotheses, and theories of biology with emphasis on cell biology, genetics, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Scriptural perspectives on the study of God’s creation and contemporary biological controversies are explored.

 

BIO 105E Biological Science Survey w/Lab

An introduction to basic observations, hypotheses, and theories of biology with emphasis on cell biology, genetics, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Scriptural perspectives on the study of God’s creation and contemporary biological controversies are explored.

 

PHY 119E Physical Science Survey

An introduction to the basic physical sciences of astronomy, physics, chemistry, meteorology, and geology. Each is considered in relation to the others and its influence on man.

 

PHY 197E Introductory Astronomy w/Lab

A descriptive course about celestial mechanics, the solar system, stars, galaxies and the universe. The course is divided into eight modules. Each module contains chapter readings, chapter questions, lab exercise or short research paper and test.

 

 

Social Work

 

SWK 200E Explorations in Social Work

An initial exposure to the field of social work by exploring what social workers are, what social workers do, and the setting in which they work. Examination of the knowledge, value, and skill base; practice settings; education and career opportunities; and the interrelationships between social work and social welfare in the United States. Opportunity is given for the student to explore his/her own interest in and potential for a career in social work. Service learning component provides interaction with a variety of community based agencies.

 

SWK 231E Social Welfare: Historical Perspectives and Development

Follows the development of social welfare efforts from early civilizations to the present time. Focuses on the emergence of the profession of social work. Explores the question: “Am I my brother’s keeper?” in the light of biblical principles.

 

Sociology

 

SOC 200E Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the principles of cultural anthropology including the analysis of major anthropological theories and concepts and an examination of social institutional arrangements in small-scale societies.

 

SOC 203E Cultural Diversity

A study of inter-group relations with an emphasis on race and ethnicity but which also addresses social class, gender, and historical issues affecting relations. Attention will be given to the tension between assimilation and multiculturalism and what it means to be an American. Students will be asked to apply biblical principles in critical reflection on these issues. The course will familiarize students with leading scholars. While the focus will be on race and ethnicity in the United States, attention will be given to the global dimensions of these concerns.

 

SOC 210E Social Problems

An introduction to the study of social issues from several perspectives. Issues in areas such as drug abuse, crime, education, and the family are examined in the light of basic principles of sociology.

 

Middle School Courses

Bible

Lightbearers (from Summit Ministries)

 

Lightbearers is a Bible curriculum for 7th-8th grade designed to help students clearly understand the tenets of the Christian worldview, and how they compare to the tenets of the leading humanistic worldviews of our day. Students will learn how to apply their Christian faith to every area of life: theology, philosophy, ethics, biology, sociology, psychology, law, politics, economics, and history.  Some of the issues covered include: abortion, apologetics, cults, evolution, feminism, homosexuality, naturalism, moral relativism, pluralism, relationships, and socialism.  Lightbearers is designed specifically for your middle school classroom, complete with day-to-day lesson plans, projects, resources, quizzes, and helps, providing all the information needed to successfully teach worldviews in your school.

Jesus: Prophet, Priest, King and Savior

Acts 4:12 declares that there is no other name given to mankind, that we might be saved–Jesus. Students will get to know Jesus through a topical study of His work and ministry, both on Earth and in Heaven. Jesus ties together God’s plan throughout the Old Testament and His interaction and intervention in the lives of those who follow Him today. Students will explore both the Old Testament roots of Jesus’ various ministries and the way those roles influence their current relationship with Him. The last module takes those ideas and puts them into practice, allowing students the opportunity to see Jesus live His life and do His ministry through them.  This year long course is designed for those in grades 5 to 9.

8th Grade Classes

Math 3 (Pre-Algebra)

Math 3 uses the connection between mathematics and music to develop and reinforce mathematical skills and processes. Students build a strong mathematical foundation as they explore the evolution of music in America. The focus of the course is learning with understanding to enable students to solve real-world and mathematical problems. The mode of instruction will vary as students interact with instructional software, practice skills on the web, participate in hands-on activities, and view instructional videos. The mathematical content addresses the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) principals and standards and is organized by Number and Operation, Algebra, Geometry, Measurement, and Data Analysis and Probability.

Science

The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities to study concepts of the life, Earth/space, and physical sciences, from a Christian perspective, and to make applications to everyday life. Students will gain an understanding of how Jesus Christ is revealed by studying His Creation. The Bible will help the student examine the order of the universe and the physical laws God has established to govern it. In addition, each student will be encouraged to provide for and protect his/her body, which is the “temple of God.” Several character qualities will be encouraged and developed as the course progresses. Using the International Space Station as the focal point for all course content, students act as Mission Specialists in Training. Topics such as the history of space exploration, light, remote sensing, plate tectonics, how gravity affects the human body, research being done in space, the periodic table of elements, and a bit of chemistry are but a few of the topics to be covered in this course.

Language Arts 3

Who am I? How do I fit into the world? How do I make sense of these changing times? This interdisciplinary eighth grade language arts course will answer those questions and many more from a Christian perspective. In this course, students will develop their reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing skills—with Biblical principles as the standard—as they explore and enjoy a variety of materials (novels, short stories, poetry, biographies, articles, drama, essays and media). In addition, Language Arts 3 focuses on effective communication strategies that students need in order to establish a Biblical worldview in this changing and challenging society. Students will explore the eighth grade theme of The American Quest: Past, Present and Future while developing reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing skills through a variety of materials (novels, short stories, poetry, biographies, articles, drama, essays and media).

7th Grade Classes

Math 2

The purpose of this course is to show students how to relate math to real life situations through a Christian Worldview.

Science

Attention all students: Adventures await you on CORAL, Colony of Research and Learning. As a member of an elite group of aquanauts in an underwater research facility, you will live and conduct research in and around the coral reefs of Virtual Key. Your tasks include investigating the problems causing the decline of tourism on Virtual Key and proposing a solution to the problems. Skills developed and concepts learned in life, earth and space, and physical sciences along with Biblical principles and application will be used in completing your tasks. It is the expectation of the government of Virtual Key that you and the other aquanauts will gather data, analyze the data, and propose a workable solution to the identified problems of Virtual Key and the surrounding areas.

Language Arts 2

In Language Arts 2, students enhance their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing skills through exploration and investigation of fiction, nonfiction, short stories, cultural studies, self discovery, and character education. Through a varied list of learning experiences, students will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of literary, informational, and Biblical texts. Using the theme of “A Time for Discovery,” Language Arts 2 students will learn and use the writing process to communicate ideas and respond critically to visual, oral, and written texts. Biblical principles shed new meaning on text, focusing on the impact of Christianity on daily life.

World Geography

Attention Special Agents! Help decide where to build an international theme park devoted to world evangelism and cultural understanding. Typically a seventh grade course, World Geography uses discovery-based learning activities to help you explore various cultural and natural landscapes of the world in order to develop a multicultural understanding of all of the people groups on the earth. You will be encouraged to use geographic concepts and skills to actively seek information that can be applied to real-life decisions. As a special agent on a simulated journey of discovery, you will apply a Biblical worldview as you collect and critically analyze social, political, and economic facts about how cultures interact with each other and their physical world.

6th Grade Classes

Math 1

This course continues the development of mathematical concepts and processes students can apply to solve real-world mathematical problems. A zoo, a wonderful home to interesting and exotic animals from around the world, provides the focal point for all course content. In this environment, students act as zookeepers who must master the math skills needed to develop and maintain a zoo. This course challenges students to explore concepts such as operations and problem solving with rational numbers, measurement techniques, number theory, geometric properties and relationships, and algebraic thinking. This course also includes the use of mathematical models that give students a visual way to explore quantitative relationships.

микрозаймы займы на карту онлайн микрозаймы онлайн в новосибирске займы в барнауле